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Drawing Realistic Textures in Pencil By J. D. Hillberry – PDF Free Download

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Uploaded by Cristina Balan. Did you find this document useful? Is this content inappropriate? Report this Document. Flag for inappropriate content. Download now. Save Save Desen – Hillberry, J. For Later. Metropolitan Museum Cleveland Museum of Art.

Internet Arcade Console Living Room. Books to Borrow Open Library. Search the Wayback Machine Search icon An illustration of a magnifying glass. Sign up for free Log in. Hillberry Item Preview. They are not as solid as blendmg stumps. The differences are great enough to cause a d1sstmilar look to a blended area. I cut these p1eces into 6″ 15cm squares for easier handling.

Use separate pteces of felt for each medium and a clean piece for blending one medium into another. Cut the squares mco smaller pieces that you can roll tightly like a tortillon co make a soft blender for small details. Use masking tape to keep the felt rolled. Felt pad Paper Pieces of paper make good blenders.

Wrap the paper around one or all of your fingers. The texture of the blendmg paper effects the outcome. A piece of textured charcoal paper used as a blender produces a different texture chan a slick piece of typing paper.

Large paintbrush Small paintbrush Facial Tissues and Paper Towels Fold a facial tissue into a small square and use the corner co get mto smaller areas.

It is very effective for lifting charcoal. Facial tissues will disintegrate quickly, so somettmes paper towels are a better choice for blending larger areas. Make sure you don’t use facial tissues chat contain Ionon or dye that could rub off on your drawing. Chamois A clean, dry chamois is great for blending when you want a smooch texture. Stay away from poor quality chamOis made for drying your car; this will break apart if rubbed on the paper too vigorously.

It’s always best to test any new material you plan to use as a blender before you use it on your drawing. Rub the chamois on a wh1te p1ece of paper to see if it leaves any color or residue. Thts keeps you from nuxmg one medium with another.

I use an ink pen to mark CH for charcoal, G for graphite and C for carbon. When you blend one medium with another, It doesn’t matter. However, It’s best to begin the blendmg process with a clean blender. Paper The rype of paper you use affects the appearance of a drawing more than any of the techniques explained in this book.

I’ll tell you some papers 1 use and why I like them, but don’t let that keep you from experimenting. Every artist has a particular way of applying media to paper. What works for me may not work for you.

I have tried the paper recommendations of many pencil artists-whose work I greatly admire-and found some of the surfaces painfully hard to work with. Choose the Right Paper for the Subject To produce a variety of realistic looking textures in your drawings, you should find at least two papers that you like to work with. One of the papers should have more tooth or texture than the other. Also consider how dark the values need to be in your drawing.

Papers with more tooth can create darker values because they hold more of your drawing media. Fine detail work and smooth textures are easier to produce with smoother papers. It’s always a losing battle. Some papers are made using a wire mesh that creates a strong directional pattern in the tooth of the paper.

The pronounced pattern that emerges when you apply the media to these papers overpowers the textures you are trying to create. If you draw realistic textures, a paper like this would be handy only if your one and only subject has a similar texture. When you experiment with papers make sure you try both sides, because the patterned tooth is sometimes only on the front. Jl4y Favorite Papers Arches lb. I use the back of the paper because the front has a patterned tooth. Its smooth surface is excellent for rendering fine details but still holds a moderate amount of media to render some dark values.

Strathmore Series drawing paper This paper has a nice random tooth pattern. This means it contains some wood pulp that will cause the paper to yellow over time. Don’t let this keep you from experimenting with it. Watercolor boards and illustration boards These boards also have great drawing surfaces. If you like to work big, you’ll have fewer problems with your drawings wrinkling on these thick surfaces.

I use Crescent No. Cold-press papers and boards typically have a much rougher texture, but Crescent No. Materials 13 PAPER F7attemng the Tooth of the Paper It’s always best to let the surface of the paper work for you by usmg a smooth paper for drawmgs with smooth subJects and a rougher paper for more textured subjects. For drawings that contain both smooth and rough textures you need to decide which type of paper will su1t the overall drawing. If you use a smooth paper, you can create the rough areas by using techniques and media that produce more texture.

These include tech niq ues found m chapter two: employing textural strokes like cross-hatchi ng and stippling, using softer pencils, usi ng blenders that create more texture, not blending at all and using the mdenung technique to produce more surface texture.

Th1s technique works best for smooth reflective surfaces like glass or metal. Tone added wrthout flattening the tooth Miscellaneous Materials Electrrc Pencrl Sharpener Frisket Film Sharpening penctls with a handheld or crank sharpener IS possible, but when the blade becomes d1rty or worn, 1t’s dtfficulr to keep the point of the pencil from breaking.

Th1s is espectally true with charcoal pencils. It’s worth the extra expense to mvest m a good electnc sharpener. Use this transparent masking film to mask areas you want ro keep wh1te while you render the surrounding areas. Sandpaper Block Use th1s to refine the point on your pencil. Twisting the pencil while you drag tt down the paper toward you resharpcns the tip.

It keeps you from using your pencil sharpener too much and wasnng pencils. You can collect the excess graphite, charcoal or carbon dust on a piece of paper under the sandpaper block. Transfer these shavings to a film container, and use the powdered medium in your drawmgs w1th a pamtbrush or a blender. It should be durable enough to withstand heavy pressure with a sharp pencil without tearing.

Mead Academic tracing paper is the brand I usc. Liquid Frisket This type of mask can be used in smaller areas than frisker film.

It’s applied with a brush or a special applicator and removed by rubbing or peeling. Some brands stain the paper and are meant to be painted over once the dried frisker IS removed.

Use the rype manufactured for use on watercolor paper in areas that will remain unpainted. I usc the Grafix brand Incredible White Mask. Fixative This spray protects your drawing. There are several brands to choose from in both maue and glossy finishes. Workable fixatives reduce smudging, yet still allow you to add media and do some erasing.

Nonworkable fixatives are permanent protec[lvc coatings made for your fimshed drawing. Lightbox Compass If you use photographs for reference material, you Th1s IS handy for the occasional perfect c1rcle, but I regularly use my compass to take measurements and check proportions. It’s amazing how much more detail is vtstble in the shadow areas. View the photo without the lightbox to see the most detai l in the lighter sections.

Ruler You’ll need a ruler to use as a straightedge and for a measurmg tool. Drafting Tape This low-tack rape sticks to paper bur will not damage the surface when removed. Use 1t to attach drawing paper ro a slanted drawing board and for masking straight edges. Drawing Lamp Many potentially great artists are hindered by their inability to see what they are doing. Even if the kitchen table is your drawing board, set up a desk lamp to illuminate your drawmg surface. Place the lamp on the side opposite your drawing hand.

This keeps the shadow of your hand from being cast on your paper. Art Knife Thts IS a pomred razor blade connected to a pen-shaped handle. Use Jt co cut shapes out of frisker for masking. Should a light background be used? Or would it have more snap with a dark one? Should the paper be smooth, or rough?

Would it be better with charcoal? Or maybe a combination of all of them? It’s enough to make you want to take up sculpting! Don’t get discouraged-this chapter shows you some unique ways of handling drawing media to produce an assortment of effects you might not have thought possible.

You still have to ask yourself all those questions, but once you know what each medium is capable of, the decisions are easier.

I am a self-taught artist, and I use many unconventional techniques in my work. The best advice I can offer you is this: Pay attention to your teacher. That meansyou. This book is merely the textbook you are using to teach yourself. Many of the techniques I demonstrate here I stumbled on by accident while experimenting with other methods.

I encourage you to explore the material in this chapter, analyze your successes as well as your failures and learn from both. Sunder Mehta One sw1pe of a clean cloth over some charcoal lines makes a beaunful progressiOn of descendmg values arc across your paper. That’s fmc, tf it’s mtentional.

If the cloth is your shirt, and you’ve JUSt produced wha t appears to be a smokmg comet through the face of yo ur latest commtssioned portratt-you’ve got a problem. Watch Those Hands Some drawmg methods reqUire an extremely un1fo rm texture, so irregularities m the paper can come back to haunt you.

To begin with, try not to touch you r drawmg paper with bare hands. Wear cotton gloves, or make sure you p1ck the paper up by the edges w here it wi ll be trimmed or covered with a mat. Even 1f you thmk your hands are clean, your fingernps can tran.

I find it impossible to make a smooth, even tone with charcoa l or graphite powder in an area w1th fingerprints. Thts keeps your hand from smearing sections that arc complete. If you’re left-handed, work from the upper right to the lower left. Bear in mind, dark charcoal smears very easily-try to save It for last. If you do end up with charcoal next to a light area that still needs to be developed, a workable fixative can help keep the charcoal m place.

However, it does change the texture of the paper wherever it’s applied. Shown here are some other methods to keep your drawings clean. Wrtures on Penctl Masking With Frisket Maskmg is generally known as a painting technique, but iris also an effective way to produce clean, crisp edges in your drawings.

It allows you to protect foreground objects from unwanted media while you render backgrounds and adjacent subjects. Two Ways to Apply Frisket Film There are two ways co use frisker film: I Cue out the shape with an art knife and then apply it to your drawing, or 2 apply the frisker to your drawing, cut the shape you need and remove the unwanted frisker from your drawing. I use the first method.

The surface of your drawing paper can easily be damaged when you cut the mask after it is attached-and many times, I have already puc in too many hours to risk that. Outline the Subject 1 lkgm by drawing rhe outline of your subject directly onro a p1ece of frisker film.

Make sure you draw on rhe film side and nor rhe backing, or you will end up wirh a rel’erse Image of your subject. Hints for Cutting Frisket Make sure your cutting surface is smooth.

A self-healing cutting mat works, but for a supersmooth cutting surface, try a piece of glass. It wears out the blades faster, but 1 find it easier if the blade doesn’t cut into the underlying surface. The cleanest cuts can be made by pulling the knife toward you. To cur rounded shapes, rotate the frisket on your cutting surface while pulling the blade toward you.

Use a straightedge to cut areas of your subject that have perfectly straight edges. Then, peel off the adhesave hackang. Always hold the peeled fnsker with the sticky sa de up to keep at from foldmg together and snckmg to at! Next, attach the stlhouene to your drawing paper. Use the shck stde of the fmket backmg to make sure the edges are securely tacked down and to force out any air bubbles.

To help keep the charcoal in place, spray your drawing with several coats of a workable fixative before you remove the imket. When the fixative IS dry, peel off the mask ro reveal the clean white silhouette of your subJect. When to Use a Fixative Since usmg a fixative alters the texture of your drawing paper, you can spray it after you remove frisker ro produce a totally different texture. Subjects that have more texture and require less separation from the background can be rendered without using fixative.

To avotd unwanted smears, make sure you cover the completed areas of your subject and background with another ptece of paper. In this chapter, I demonstrate how I render a variety of subjects. Certam distinguishing characteristics help 1dentify every obJeCt.

These are the traits that make glass look like glass, leather look like leather, etc. Rendenng the texture of an object boils down to successfully imitating its most distinguishing characteristics. I hope this section also helps you to think on your feet. Don’t follow the captions like a recipe book without regard for the outcome on your paper.

Remember, a vanety of values can be produced by adjustmg the pressure applied to the penc1L To reproduce the values as you see them here, you may need to adjust pencil pressure or use slightly harder or softer pencils. The amount you need to layer and blend may also vary, so check your values and textures before proceeding to the next step. Also keep in mind that I adjust values and shapes throughout the drawings. Look and read several steps ahead to see where I end up , instead of becoming bogged down m one particular step.

Metal can be rough and pitted or smooth a nd reflective. I use totally different methods and media to render each.

All types of metal can be rendered realistically using charcoal, graphite, carbon or a combination of all three. The secret is in knowing the special characteristiCS of the three types of pencils, and letting them work for you.

Old Pitted Metal The technique of indenting the paper works well to indicate scratches and pits in old metal. I often use a Wolff’s B carbon pencil to shade over the impressions I make in the paper. Carbon pencils get as dark as charcoal but reflect more lig ht. Therefo re, w hen ca rbon is adjacent to a charcoal background or another object rendered with charcoal, it seems to have more presence and come forward in the picture.

Charcoal or graph1te may also be used to render old metal. Depending on your subject and background, either of these may be a better choice. Bad Luck or A horseshoe hanging upside down is said to be bad luck, but here it is just an illusion. You are fooled into believing you see the symbol for bad luck, just as you are fooled into believing in the superstition. Use the broad side of a soft vine charcoal stick ro apply a mediwn dark value for the background.

Spray with a fixative and then remove the mask. Lighrly sketch the nails and the inner contours of the horseshoe. Next, use tracing paper and a 6H graphite pencil make numerous indentations in the paper that will resemble light reflecting off the to pits in the metal. Look at step 2 ro give you an idea of the size and amount of stippling use. Intuitive step-by-step lessons then demonstrate how you can put your newfound skills to use by rendering everything from metal, glass, and wood textures to fur and feathers.

Each concept is clearly explained in easy-to-comprehend language, making this book an accessible and approachable resource for beginning artists and art enthusiasts. Basic Textures in Pencil allows artists to widen the scope of their abilities, demonstrating basic pencil drawing techniques that allow beginners to re-create a variety of common textures and surfaces. Get a feel for your art—literally! Knowing how to make your surfaces and textures look real is one of the most challenging aspects of creating art in colored pencil, even for experienced artists.

To get you started, this comprehensive guide opens with a review of tools and materials as well as basic skills, such as strokes, effects, and color mixing. Each page of instruction is a comprehensive resource on how to create a specific texture, complete with two to three easy-to-follow steps and a final, detailed image of the finished artwork. Plus, the book is organized into sections based on subject matter, so you can easily find the specific texture you’re looking for.

An artist’s gallery in the back of the book provides examples of the textures in completed works of art. This book demonstrates simple techniques for rendering the textures of everyday objects, such as metal, wood, plastic, hair, fur, feathers, and more. Drawing an eye or any other object, takes skill to reflect realism at different levels. When embarking on a new drawing, planning is an essential part of achieving accuracy.

It is important to have a plan in mind, lay down your plan on paper. If you want to draw a realistic eye or any other object, it is important to be aware of different textures of paper and pencils along with different sets of supply.

 
 

 

Jd hillberry-drawing realistic textures in pencil free download pdf

 

This comparison was done on the backside of Arches Ib. The dark vertical strip was made with a 4B charcoal pencil. With cach blender, I made twenty circular strokes through the strip followed by ten swipes emanating from each circle. Do Your Own Comparisons Do some blending comparisons like the ones here using various types of paper, pencils and blenders.

Label and save the most diverse ones for textural reference ma- terial. Experiment with other items to use as blenders, such as smooth and rough fabrics. You never know when you might come across something that will pro- duce a unique texture. Just make sure your blending.

When you use a felt pad to apply the medium, i’s important to consider the direction of the stokes since tiny dots and dashes are dispersed in the direction youmove the felt. Use this to your advantage in replicating coarse textures that have directional lines, such as wood and denim. The paper you use toblend with makes a diference in the texture created. I wrapped ut the texture of the drawing paper. Compared withthe felt and paper blender, facial tissue is very good at softening unwanted strokes.

Use it like an eraser to lighten large masses of dark charcoal. Ifa texture created by one of the other three blenders is too harsh, blending lightly with a chamois softens it. The value at the beginning ofthe arcis only slightly darker than the end, which means it retains and disperses the charcoal mote evenly than the other three blenders. The delicate shading in the white of an eye is one example. Simply rolling the chamois makes spirals on the tip that will not slide across your paper evenly.

By folding the chamois, and rolling both sides to the middle, you can make a small, smooth blender. Then, take the Starting at the tip, coll one of the folded edges uni it eaches top comets and fold them down to form a point atthe clean spot. Roll the chamois tighter towards the tp to make it firm. Roll the Other Side Do the same withthe other side. Make sure you don’t oll past the tip o it will create coils on the bottom ofthe chamois, making it impossible to blend evenly.

To use the blender, hold i with the rolled edges on top. This allows the smoothest surface to touch your paper. If you overblend, you need to gradually lighten the halftone values. Working, re the illusion of form. The more you from light to dark, use a clean chamois to gently lift the medium. Use light strokes in the same direction the me- dium was applied.

As the chamois becomes loaded with the medium, it will deposit it again with each stroke. They are blended on as the pencil strokes. The same ules apply when blending from dark to light—follow the contours ofthe form and the srokes when you blend. For instance, the random dots and dashes created by blending with a felt pad can be climinated by first blending the charcoal with a stump.

Perceived texture uss light and shadow to give the illusion thatthe object contains texture. Real texture is the actual texture produced by applying the medium to the paper.

Real texture is influenced by the hardness of the pencil and the tooth ofthe paper. Tones made with softer pencils create rougher textures. The surface ofthe paper ean be altered to form new textures by ereating indentations or by flattening the paper’s tooth. The three drawing media I use also produce dissimilar real textures on the surface of the paper. The individual granules of charcoal have an irregular shape. When light strikes a drawing containing these particles, it bounces back in many different directions.

The darkest values in drawing are the shadows, and, if you are trying to render a subject as realistically as possible, the last thing you want is a shadow that reflects more light than the subject does.

Because of the size and shape of the charcoal parti- dle, rones produced with charcoal appear rougher than those made with graphite. Soft charcoal produces rougher texture than harder charcoal. When you look at your subject, pick out the features with the roughest textures.

If you use charcoal to render those areas, you will create a much more realistic drawing. The lines are dark enough to see yet easily removed with a kneaded eraser. For rendering, graphite can produce much more delicate textures than charcoal. This causes light to reflect off the graphite in your drawings. Take advantage of these inherent qualities, and render all smooth and shiny subjects with graphite. The dark values of charcoal can be grad- using charcoal to render that area automatically adds ually blended into the light tones of graphite.

This tech- more texture, nique is good for subjects that gradually turn away from Blend Charcoal Into Graphite Begin by applying 3B and B charcoal to produce progressively lighter values as the form turns toward the light.

Then, blend with felt ro form the lend With Felt Usea felt pad to blend the charcoal to ward the light side of the form. Try not to pick up more charcoal on your blender, because that produces more texture. To render this texture realistically, you need the darkness of charcoal plus the reflecting qualities of graphite. You can apply graphi cal 1 achieve a remarkably smooth, directly over char- dark, reflective Charcoal texture.

Apply the charcoal first. Since graphite particles are flat, they tend to be slick, which makes it difficult to render charcoal over graphite. To keep the texture smooth in the lighter sections of reflective surfaces, use graphite alone.

The next is 48 graphite. The smooth, dark section is 4B graphite layered over the HB charcoal. Light-Reflecting Qualities All of the illustrations in this book have been photo- graphed from directly in front of the drawings. This eliminates the light-reflecting qualities that are appar ent in my original work. If you use the media specified to do the step-by-step exercises, your drawings will also take on this added dimension. By moving slightly to one side of the example, you can see the reflecting qual: ity of graphite layered over charcoal.

Blending the lay ers of charcoal diminishes the amount of reflection. You can collect large amounts of the powder from your, sandpaper block and store it in a film container. Tape the paper to one side of your drawing, board.

Next, tape the sandpaper block on the paper and tape it edge of a piece of paper to form a trough to catch charcoal down. The pencil lines left behind can be used to load blenders with the drawing medium. This method works best for smaller areas since itis easier to control the amount of medium loaded om the blender.

When fersthe imprint of the texture to the paper. Many things icc the look of the imprint. The lighter weight the ieee the nore texture is transferred. For a good trans- fer, the paper should be no heavier than Ib. The type and hardness of ee oe eel eal aide of a charcoal or graphite stick works best, conflicting directional lines. It can be used as a foundation on er ea objects you find around the house. Then, pick out high- lights and add shading to embellish the texture.

On che right, no. The broad side of a 6 graphite stick was used to make the cub: bing. While the paper was still attached to the tle, [blended the right side with a stump. Many times people attempt to handle this problem by avoiding the white while they render the surrounding darker values, or by trying to erase back to white after the dark values are complete. Even erasing with an eraser pen leaves some medium on the paper.

This simple technique creates thin lines of white surrounded by darker values. Itis a perfect example of learning from your failures. Iwas using tracing paper to transfer a sketch onto my draw- ing paper. Things were not going well, and 1 was iri- tated when I had to begin again for the third time. Ap- parently, I took it out on my drawing paper because when I lifted the tracing paper, I noticed litle grooves where I had pressed too hard with my pencil.

But when I rendered the subject I noticed as the paper got darker, the grooves stayed white and appeared even more striking. Since then, I hhave seen colored-pencil artists use a similar impressing technique and always wonder whether they also learned it the hard way. Cover with Tracing Paper Tape a piece of tracing paper to your drawing paper. Push hard enough to make impressions in your paper. The 3B charcoal pencil to darks end of your kneaded eraser to a point and clean 0 where the stitches receive the most light.

Finally, define each stitch jons with a sharp HB. This is not obvious until you apply charcoal or graphite over the impression. Fortunately you can modify and even eliminate the white lines that were produced.

For the lines on the top I fille in sections of the grooves with a sharp HB charcoal persil to make them all the same length. Ten I blended those areas with a small stump. The curved line on the bottom was transformed into a series of dashes using the same method. For imitating other fextures—like rock—you achieve a more realistic look if the indentations vary in size and shape.

Any clean stylus can be used to make irregular, high contrasting spots of white—as long as the stylus pushes in the paper without ccutting or tearing it. Use the stylus directly on your drawing paper with no paper clips, empty ink pens tracing paper barrier, I have used nails, coin and even rocks to make irregular indentations.

Irregularities affect the quality of your cuts. A self-healing cutting mat works, but for a supersmooth cutting surface, try 4 piece of glass. The cleanest cuts can be made by pulling the knife toward you. To cut rounded shapes, rotate the frisket on your cutting surface while pulling the blade toward you.

Use a straightedge to cut areas of your subject that have perfectly straight edges. Next, attach the sihouete ro your drawing paper. To help keep the charcoal in place spray your drawing wit several coats of a workable fixative before you remove the Fiske. When the fixative is dry, pel off the mask to reveal the clean white silhouette of our sj.

When to Use a Fixative Since using fixative alters the texture of your drawing paper, you can spray it after you remove frisket to po: dace atotlly different texture. To avoid unwanted smears, make sure you cover the com. Draw Realistic Objects ow that you understand the techniques used to create dramatic contrasts and interesting textures, you can put them to work to render subjects more realistically.

In this chapter, I demonstrate how I render a variety of subjects. Certain distinguishing characteristics help identify every object. These are the traits that make glass look like glass, leather look like leather, ete. Rendering the texture of an object boils down to successfully imitating its most distinguishing characteristics. T hope this section also helps you to think on your feet.

Don’t follow the captions like a recipe book without regard for the outcome on your paper. You need to use your knowledge of the media and techniques but most of all, your gs. The letters that delineate the degree of pencil hardness are contained in the captions, but use them as basic guidelines. Remember, a variety of values can be produced by adjusting the pressure applied to the pencil.

To reproduce the values as you see them here, you may need to adjust pencil pressure or use slightly harder or softer pencils. The amount you need to layer and blend may also vary, s0 check your values and textures before proceeding to the next sep Also keep in mind that I adjust values and shapes throughout the drawings.

Look and read several steps ahead to see where I end up, instead of becoming bogged down in one particular step. Metal can be rough and pitted or smooth and reflective. I use totally different methods and media to render each. All types of metal can be rendered realistically using charcoal, graph ite, carbon or a combination of all three. The secret is in knowing the special characteristics of the three types of pencils, and letting them work for you.

Carbon pencils g Renal 46 Drawing Realistic Tex reflect more light. Therefore, when carbon is adjacent to a charcoal background or another object rendered with charcoal, it seems to have more presence and come for: ward in the picture. Charcoal or graphite may also be used to render old metal. Depending on your subject and background, either of these may be a better choice. Bad Luck or. A horseshoe hanging upside down is said to be bad luck, but here it isjust an illusion.

You are fooled into believing you see the symbol for bad luck, just as you are fooled into believing in the superstition, Mask the Horseshoe Shape Cur the horseshoe shape out of frisket, and attach the silhouette to your paper. Use the broad side of a soft vine charcoal stick. Lightly sketch the nails and the inner contours of the horseshoe. Next, ase tracing paper and a 6H graphite pencil to make numerous indentations in the pa per that will resemble light reflecting off the pits in the metal.

Look at step 2t0 give you an idea of te size and amount of tipping 0 use. Leave the pencil point dull so the carbon skips over the indentations in the paper, leaving them white. Use more press the d and stay away from light halfeones and highlights, Apply Workable Fixative Use a workable fixative before rendering the horseshoe. They can be subtle but when they are included they help carry your drawing toa high level of realism. Here, light bounces off the horseshoe nails back conto the front of the horseshoe Deewing Realntic Textures in Pencil Sled with a tortion Blend the Carbon Use a small paintbrush and torillon to blend and fine-tune the textures ofthe horseshoe.

Apply HB charcoal with a tori Jon for the smooth, light halftones. Use your kneaded eraser to keep the highlights and light halftones clean, Darken the shadow on the inside of the horseshoe by layering 3B charcoal over Beatbon.

Render the nail using Wolf’s B carbon forthe shaf along with F and 6B graphite for the head of the nail. See pages for more de tailed information on rendering nails. This keeps the inden tions white. This makes graphite and charcoal perfect for shiny metal. For dark reflective areas, charcoal can be ap- plied first, followed by the graphite.

Since the paper is your lightest value, save it for the highlights on the metal When you set up a scene to draw, keep in mind that the appearance of reflective metal, such as a silver goblet, is affected by its surroundings. Itis essentially a distorted mieror reflecti to your advantage by placing other still-life objects in positions that make it easy to identify and draw their reflections.

I’s also rything that is being reflected in your studio before including it -verything around it. Mask a Silhouette of the Coins Mask the coin shapes and the ledge they sit on. Then, apply 28 charcoal and blend with a stump. Spray the area with a work tthe fixative to keep the charcoal from smearing, Then remove the mask Using a shar deal ofthe 2H graphite pencil, begin lightly outlining the to get the proper placement of all the elements If you press too hard, the details on the coins will appear more drawn than raise, Get the Most From This Exercise You can follow these steps and copy my drawing of the three coins, but to learn the most from this exercise, place a coin on your drawing table and light it from the upper left.

Light it from the right if you are left handed. Move it around or prop ic up until you see good contrast and reflections from the light. I set up the arrangement in my studio and lit it from the upper left side to get the placement of all the elements and their cast shadows. I laid a coin in front of me on my drawing table to see the details more clearly.

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Product Details. Uploaded by Cristina Balan. User Settings. Now it s time More information. Enjoy the wonderful photo realistic artwork in this book and learn the techniques used to achieve realistic artwork. Jones, teaching real estate agents and brokers the fun, fast and easy ways to.

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